Programe

Internship Opportunity: Media Project Intern (1 position) , and Community Empowerment & Networking Project Intern (1 position).

Sahmakum Teang Tnaut (STT) is a non-governmental organization, non-profitable, was set up in September 2005 and officially registered with the ministry of interior in December 2006. STT tries to reflect in its work with urban communities. From the outset, STT has had a focus on infrastructure upgrading, but over the past decade, many communities have been impacted by development relating to land alienation and evictions. Because of this, STT has strengthened its research and advocacy to draw attention to a development policy that in Phnom Penh alone has led to 270,000 residents being displaced since 1990. By supporting genuine community complaints and grievances, STT and its partners have been helping communities articulate their concerns to local and international Medias, donors, and other NGOs and INGOs.

To support our projects, STT is looking for a qualified project intern to join our dynamic team as following:

Media Project Intern

Unit              : Advocacy and Outreach Program

Job Title       : Media Project Intern

Reporting to  : Project Manager

Hiring          : 1 Position

Schedule       : Full Time (Monday-Friday)

Project Period: 3-6 months

Allowance     : USD 150 per month  and other benefits

Main responsibilities

  • Assist the Community Media and ICT team in organizing community training sessions, community meetings, livestream and other related project activities which are assigned by the Project Manager.
  • Assist the technical team in monitoring networks and digital devices.
  • Assist the IT team with troubleshooting issues and provide technical support
  • Tracking Media and Field visits
  • Perform other tasks assigned by the Project Manager and Project Staff.

Qualification

  • University student or a recent graduate in the field of Computer Science, Information Technology, Media Communication or other related fields,
  • Willing to learn and get experience during internship,
  • Demonstrate a high level of ethical commitment and trustworthiness,
  • Ability to use a computer with applications relevant to the study fields,
  • Understand English for communication,
  • Willing to learn and commit to work full time and can travel to target communities (as required)
  • Be honest, loyalty, friendly, and hard working

Community Empowerment and Networking Project Intern

Unit              : Advocacy and Outreach Program

Job Title       : Community Empowerment and Networking Project Intern

Reporting to  : Project Manager

Hiring          : 1 Position

Schedule       : Full Time (Monday-Friday)

Project Period: 3-6 months

Allowance     : USD 150 per month  and other benefits

 

Main responsibilities

  • Collaborate with the Project Officers in designing and completing monitoring and evaluation activities for target communities.
  • Conduct field and desk research, including data collection, analysis, and reporting.
  • Participate in training, meeting on data collection tools and analysis methods.
  • Conduct surveys and interviews in target communities as assigned.
  • Develop and manage questionnaires and input data into the designated data management system.
  • Assist with preparing training materials, meeting presentations, and site visit documentation for community engagement.
  • Undertake additional tasks as needed by the Project Manager.

Qualification

  • Undergraduate student or recent graduate with a bachelor’s degree in law, Social & Environmental Science, or a related field.
  • Proficiency in Microsoft Office Suite and familiarity with statistical analysis software preferred.
  • Good written and verbal communication skills in English and Khmer are essential.
  • Demonstrated eagerness to learn new skills, adapt to new tasks, and work collaboratively.
  • Honesty, integrity, and strong work ethic with a commitment to full-time work and travel to target communities.

How to apply

Interested candidates should send their CV and cover letters to STT’s Administration and Human Resources through email recruitment@teangtnaut.org, or Address: #21, St472, Toul Tompoung 1, chamkarmon, Phnom Penh Applications that do not indicate the position being applied for will not be considered. Only shortlisted candidates will be contacted for an interview.

Closing date: The applicants will not be considered after 5pm on 23 April 2024.

Debate competition under the theme “Sustainable development should be centered around the environment and vulnerable individuals”.

27th February 2024, Phnom Penh. Congratulations to the opposing team for winning the first prize in the debate competition on the topic “should the lakes be developed or kept,” organized by STT with 39 participants from urban youth communities and young people from various universities.

1. The event aimed to provide young people with opportunities to participate in topics related to human rights, urban development, and environmental issues in Cambodia.
2. It also encouraged youths to engage in dialogue, raise issues, and propose solutions that promote a transparent, peaceful, and just development process.

   

   

   

   

The Statement of World Habitat Day 2023

On the 38th World Habitat Day, we, the people from the land and housing communities in Phnom Penh and the provinces, are facing insecurity regarding land and housing due to inadequate development. We are concerned about forced evictions and insufficient compensation, as we have historically endured such hardships. The Cambodian Constitution, specifically Article 44, guarantees the right to own property and proper housing for all citizens. Additionally, international human rights law, including the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights, guarantees the right to adequate housing.
During the week of October 1-7, 2023, in commemoration of World Habitat Day, over 1,000 community members, youth, and local authorities from 16 communities in Phnom Penh and other affected provinces gathered under the theme of “Housing Justice and Inclusive Development.” This event aimed to address the violations of land and housing rights.
On World Habitat Day 2023, we urge the government to take the following actions:
– The Royal Government should respect and protect the rights of impoverished individuals to live with decency and dignity, in line with other citizens.
– The Royal Government must effectively enforce the law and cease forced evictions, violence, and judicial oppression, particularly targeting land and housing activists.
– The Royal Government, along with authorities at all levels, should prioritize the right to adequate housing for comprehensive development.
– All development projects should conduct assessments of their social, economic, and environmental impacts, paying special attention to vulnerable populations.
– Local authorities should expedite the issuance of residence cards, family books, and equity cards to land community members lacking access to social services.
– Phnom Penh Capital Hall should provide infrastructure and improved services in impoverished residential areas, including drainage, garbage collection, and connection to state water and electricity networks.
– Relevant government authorities must ensure that all development processes adhere to the principles of the rule of law, including openness, transparency, accountability, and stakeholder involvement. Affected individuals, in particular, should have a voice in discussing concerns and potential resolutions for the benefit of all parties involved.

Call for grant applications Research/Studies on Human Rights and the Environment

Background 

Development is increasing at an unprecedented rate, in Phnom Penh, leading to long lasting environmental and social impacts. Wasteful and unsustainable housing for the rich, which are routinely undertaken prior to conducting comprehensive environmental and social impact assessments, are undermining the enjoyment of decent housing for the urban poor and contributing to the current climate crisis.

Cambodia comprises the largest youth and adolescent population in the South East Asian region. The involvement of young people in social and environmental development issues has been observed via social media and in groups throughout Phnom Penh. As a result, the youth are critical players in building and strengthening public outreach and awareness on urban and environmental issues in Phnom Penh, and manifest the great potential to drive economic and social development.

We are interested in original research proposals analyzing one of the topics below, from a human rights and environmental perspective, possibly also to do with the context of Covid-19:

  • Poverty and Human Rights
  • Rights of Persons with Disabilities
  • Women’s Rights
  • Environment and Human Rights
  • Environment and sustainability
  • Climate change
  • Trash in Phnom Penh
  • Flooding in Phnom Penh
  • Good governance of communal development plans in the urban poor community
  • Economic Inequality in Phnom Penh
  • Other topics related to Environment and Human rights

 

Purpose

This project will aim to build the capacity of groups who are generally not given a voice, such as the urban poor and the youth, so that they are able to promote good environmental governance, in a safe and peaceful manner.

What Sahmakum Teang Tnaut Offers:

  • Research grant: 800 USD to conduct individual research​ or group research.
  • Technical support and monitoring during the research.
  • Opportunity to be supported by STT to disseminate the paper via a soft-launch onto STT’s website.
  • Eligibility

Applicants are to meet the following criteria:

  • Be nationals of Cambodia
  • Applicants must have reached at least year two of a relevant university bachelor program, or be pursuing a graduate degree
  • A candidate has the right to research only one topic
  • Deliverables expected from the researchers

The researchers are expected to join the various meetings and produce the following deliverables in Khmer or English. 

Timeline

No Activities Date
1 Interesting candidate registration for research 11-24, April 2022
2 Consultation Workshop on research 26 April 2022
3 Open submitting application 26 April to 03 May 2022
4 Shortlist candidates 06 May 2022
5 Oral interview 09 May 2022
6 Inform successor candidates 10 May 2022
7 First meeting​ឹឹិ with successor 14 May 2022
8 Providing technical support by STT experts 16-17 May 2022
9 Draft paper submission for review and input 10 June 2022
10 First paper submission 20 June 2022
11 Feedback commentary 27 June 2022
12 Second paper submission 30 June 2022
13 Second feedback commentary 7 July 2022
14 Final submission of the paper 15 July 2022
15 Reflection meeting with all grantees 19 July 2022

 

How to Apply 

Interested candidates can register through the link https://forms.gle/WRTNUbeCBp6mS1rb7 before 21 April 2022.

 

Ensuring an adequate relocation site for railway communities

An overview of the situation 

In early August 2022, 320 families in Phnom Penh’s Kilometer 6 commune (known hereon as the railway community) accepted a land compensation package, administered by local authorities, through a lucky draw. This land dispute was caused by a development project: to build a 12-meter-wide concrete road, as well as a drainage system, by the old train tracks. The new road will run from Tuol Kork district to Russey Keo via Daun Penh causing the eviction of the railway community. Following a number of advocacy efforts and negotiations, the Russey Keo district’s administration set up a lucky draw, to allocate each affected family with a plot of land, in a nearby area along the O Veng Canal of Boeung Salang, also in the Russey Keo district.  

Each family received a plot of land of 4 meters x 15 meters without any monetary compensation. This resolution came after a decade of community and activist-led advocacy, as members of the railway community relentlessly defended their right to land and adequate housing. The community is primarily concerned that the infrastructure for their new homes will not be built any time soon, as many parts of the site have only just been filled with soil to make way for house construction.    

Current housing situation of railway residents
Current housing situation of railway residents

Site visit and discussion with community leader and members  

Following the acceptance of the plots of land, STT went to visit the relocation sites to investigate the situation. Some parts of the site had already been demarcated for the railway community residents. However, none of the families have moved to the new location site yet​​​ due to its unreadiness. It was also noted that there are no clean water or electricity outlets in place. The road in front of the allocated plots of land has not been developed either, it is currently covered in gravel.  

Plots of lands were divided and given to the railway residents

One of the community leaders told STT that even though families accepted the compensation, they made a public request at a press conference, calling the City authorities to provide extra financial and material support. Families need money for transporting construction materials, construction costs, clean water and electricity connections, land titling, and so on. The next step will be to ask for land title registration. The community leader has stressed that this is of utmost urgency, and he is currently seeking support from the City and local authorities.  

On the 9th of August 2022, a few other community members expressed relief that the government authorities provided them with some compensation. However, they are still concerned over the lack of financial help for rebuilding their homes on the plots of land along the canal. Community members expressed the same apprehension as the community leader, with regards to access to water, electricity, and land titling. One concern for STT is that these communities will approach Micro-Finance Institutions to ask for loans to build their new homes. Many NGOs including STT have documented predatory practices undertaken by MFIs in Cambodia. If loans are taken out to build houses, the poor will face further challenges. 

An excavator clearing land for relocation sites
An excavator clearing land for relocation sites

Key legal instruments to ensure the quality of relocation 

The right to adequate housing is guaranteed by a list of national laws and regulations, as well as international human rights instruments. Firstly, Article 25 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights provides that everyone is entitled to the right to housing. This is elucidated further in the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, which states, under Article 11, that governments must take “appropriate steps” to ensure the realization of this right. However, the relationship between eviction, resettlement and human rights is not clearly delineated here. 

The Constitution of Cambodia (1993) recognizes the importance of human rights, notably those stipulated in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, through Article 31. With regards to eviction and resettlement, Article 44 of the Constitution outlines the right to land, stressing that land ownership in Cambodia is a right reserved to all Khmer citizens. 

The “Circular on Resolution on Temporary Settlements on Land Which Has Been Illegally Occupied in The Capital, Municipal and Urban Areas,” more commonly known as “Circular 03,” is a government policy aimed to help address urban land disputes. Circular 03, signed off in 2010, is a dispute resolution mechanism for communities said to be occupying public space, private state land, or private company-owned land, in confrontation with authorities. 

The Government of Cambodia also set up the “National Housing Policy” in 2014. This is a further step towards the realisation of the right to housing for Cambodian citizens, especially the urban poor. This policy acknowledges that the right to housing is a human right, by outlining requirements for house construction, upgrading, and financing. The housing policy emphasises the need for good housing governance in conjunction with proper land-use planning. 

Finally, the “Human Rights Commentary and Guidelines on Eviction and Resettlement” published by the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights to Cambodia (OHCHR,) outlines the rights of individuals which need to be respected during eviction and relocation processes. Although it carries no legal weight, and it is unclear if authorities are aware of its existence, it is an important tool to help outline key principles that must be upheldto respect human rights norms and standards during eviction processes. Most importantly, the guideline stipulates that “All resettlement measures, such as the construction of homes, the provision of water, electricity, sanitation, schools, access to roads, and the allocation of land, shall adhere to internationally recognized human rights principles.” 

Conclusion 

The Phnom Penh Kilometer 6 commune’s right to adequate housing should be respected and protected under domestic and international laws. Plots of land provided by the City authorities are not enough. The community’s need for material and construction costs, basic infrastructure such as roads, connection to electricity and clean water, should be provided by the authorities. As it stands, the government and the authorities are not fulfilling their legal obligations to provide adequate compensation for the affected communities. Furthermore, the relocated families need to be given land titles once all other basic needs are covered. 

 An overview of the situation 

In early August 2022, 320 families in Phnom Penh’s Kilometer 6 commune (known hereon as the railway community) accepted a land compensation package, administered by local authorities, through a lucky draw. This land dispute was caused by a development project: to build a 12-meter-wide concrete road, as well as a drainage system, by the old train tracks. The new road will run from Tuol Kork district to Russey Keo via Daun Penh causing the eviction of the railway community. Following a number of advocacy efforts and negotiations, the Russey Keo district’s administration set up a lucky draw, to allocate each affected family with a plot of land, in a nearby area along the O Veng Canal of Boeung Salang, also in the Russey Keo district.  

Each family received a plot of land of 4 meters x 15 meters without any monetary compensation. This resolution came after a decade of community and activist-led advocacy, as members of the railway community relentlessly defended their right to land and adequate housing. The community is primarily concerned that the infrastructure for their new homes will not be built any time soon, as many parts of the site have only just been filled with soil to make way for house construction.    

Current housing situation of railway residents
Current housing situation of railway residents

Site visit and discussion with community leader and members  

Following the acceptance of the plots of land, STT went to visit the relocation sites to investigate the situation. Some parts of the site had already been demarcated for the railway community residents. However, none of the families have moved to the new location site yet​​​ due to its unreadiness. It was also noted that there are no clean water or electricity outlets in place. The road in front of the allocated plots of land has not been developed either, it is currently covered in gravel.  

Plots of lands were divided and given to the railway residents

One of the community leaders told STT that even though families accepted the compensation, they made a public request at a press conference, calling the City authorities to provide extra financial and material support. Families need money for transporting construction materials, construction costs, clean water and electricity connections, land titling, and so on. The next step will be to ask for land title registration. The community leader has stressed that this is of utmost urgency, and he is currently seeking support from the City and local authorities.  

On the 9th of August 2022, a few other community members expressed relief that the government authorities provided them with some compensation. However, they are still concerned over the lack of financial help for rebuilding their homes on the plots of land along the canal. Community members expressed the same apprehension as the community leader, with regards to access to water, electricity, and land titling. One concern for STT is that these communities will approach Micro-Finance Institutions to ask for loans to build their new homes. Many NGOs including STT have documented predatory practices undertaken by MFIs in Cambodia. If loans are taken out to build houses, the poor will face further challenges. 

An excavator clearing land for relocation sites
An excavator clearing land for relocation sites

Key legal instruments to ensure the quality of relocation 

The right to adequate housing is guaranteed by a list of national laws and regulations, as well as international human rights instruments. Firstly, Article 25 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights provides that everyone is entitled to the right to housing. This is elucidated further in the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, which states, under Article 11, that governments must take “appropriate steps” to ensure the realization of this right. However, the relationship between eviction, resettlement and human rights is not clearly delineated here. 

The Constitution of Cambodia (1993) recognizes the importance of human rights, notably those stipulated in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, through Article 31. With regards to eviction and resettlement, Article 44 of the Constitution outlines the right to land, stressing that land ownership in Cambodia is a right reserved to all Khmer citizens. 

The “Circular on Resolution on Temporary Settlements on Land Which Has Been Illegally Occupied in The Capital, Municipal and Urban Areas,” more commonly known as “Circular 03,” is a government policy aimed to help address urban land disputes. Circular 03, signed off in 2010, is a dispute resolution mechanism for communities said to be occupying public space, private state land, or private company-owned land, in confrontation with authorities. 

The Government of Cambodia also set up the “National Housing Policy” in 2014. This is a further step towards the realisation of the right to housing for Cambodian citizens, especially the urban poor. This policy acknowledges that the right to housing is a human right, by outlining requirements for house construction, upgrading, and financing. The housing policy emphasises the need for good housing governance in conjunction with proper land-use planning. 

Finally, the “Human Rights Commentary and Guidelines on Eviction and Resettlement” published by the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights to Cambodia (OHCHR,) outlines the rights of individuals which need to be respected during eviction and relocation processes. Although it carries no legal weight, and it is unclear if authorities are aware of its existence, it is an important tool to help outline key principles that must be upheldto respect human rights norms and standards during eviction processes. Most importantly, the guideline stipulates that “All resettlement measures, such as the construction of homes, the provision of water, electricity, sanitation, schools, access to roads, and the allocation of land, shall adhere to internationally recognized human rights principles.” 

Conclusion 

The Phnom Penh Kilometer 6 commune’s right to adequate housing should be respected and protected under domestic and international laws. Plots of land provided by the City authorities are not enough. The community’s need for material and construction costs, basic infrastructure such as roads, connection to electricity and clean water, should be provided by the authorities. As it stands, the government and the authorities are not fulfilling their legal obligations to provide adequate compensation for the affected communities. Furthermore, the relocated families need to be given land titles once all other basic needs are covered. 

 

Story of Change Steung Kambot Community

Background

Steung Kambot is an urban poor community located in Lor Kam Bour village, Svay Pak commune, Russey Keo district, Phnom Penh. There are 210 households, 244 families, and 847 community members (437 females). They have lived there since 1979 and continue to live there to this day.

Problem/ Challenge

Because some of the community’s houses were located along Street 1003, Russey Keo authorities did not provide land titles, nor did they recognize their land tenure. Furthermore, authorities referred to the community as a community living on public state roads. Despite having lived there since 1979, the community never obtained any official documentation to act as proof for their settlement and land titling. The community members lack confidence to advocate for their livelihoods and land tenure. From 2020 to 2021, the community suffered from the widening of the 30-meter road, and they still live under fear of imminent eviction, which could potentially have them relocate far from their original settlement.

Intervention by STT

Sahmakum Teang Tnaut (STT) went to observe and discuss the community’s challenges. After hearing their problems, STT implemented a project with the community. The project included training on the Land Law, Circular 03/06, Human Rights Principles, Advocacy and ICT skills. Now the community understands such issues better and have developed more confidence and courage. People in the community have become united and advocate very seriously about their land issues to find a solution.

More recently, the community members organized a public march to an event at the building of the Ministry of Land Management, and Urban Planning and Construction, where the Prime Minister presided. The community members just wanted to raise two points: on-site development, and land titling. The Khan authorities said that the campaign was illegal since the community residents had not submitted requests to relevant local authorities.

Result/ Outcome/ Change

As a result of STT’s intervention, the community members now have the capacity to lead community and advocacy activities more independently, with confidence. From September 2020 until now, the community has submitted five petitions to four ministries and one letter to the Prime Minister’s cabinet seeking intervention in their land settlement. In addition, on 29 October 2021, they submitted their letter to the Ministry of Justice and the relevant Anti-Corruption Unit to request intervention on their land issue. Mr. Makara received an invitation from the Russey Keo district administration to discuss the community’s land situation.

However, Mr. Sar Makara refused to attend the meeting with Mr. Prach Seiha, Deputy Governor of Russey Keo District, because Mr. Sar Makara stated that this meeting could take place only with the participation of at least 10 to 12 members of the community’s committee.

Community representatives went to the Ministry of Justice and Anti-Corruption Unit for following up the petition

 

In October 2021, Community members (244 families) of Steung Kambot community conducted a campaign to request the government to look at their land issue. The community blocked the street to force the authority to consider their land problem. One of the community leaders, Mrs Long Poch said “SuSu (keeping fighting for land rights)! I will die on the land”.

Authorities of Russey Keo district finally conducted a meeting with the community on the 11 November, 2021 to discuss with the community on the issues and to find solutions. More than 200 Community members of Steung Kambot community met with Mr. Ek Khun Doeun, the governor of Khan Russey Keo, to discuss and find a solution for their land issue.

Another community representative, Mrs. Reoung Oun said that “We, the community members have been living here for 30 years without a land title, but the Borey (gated-community) company has only been developing for 3 to 5 years, and getting the land title, this is very unfair for the communities.

The community members will continue to advocate by conducting advocacy events at both local and national levels, including the follow-up of submitted petitions to relevant government’s ministries and institutions.

Story of Change Russey Sros Community

Background

Russey Sros Community is located in a residential area at Group 7 and 8, Russey Sros Village, Sangkat Niroth, Khan Chbar Ampov, in Phnom Penh. It was originally settled in 1979. There are 465 people living in the area, consisting of 100 families, occupying 100 houses. All residents are ethnically Khmer, and include eight individuals who are disabled. In 2010, the community met to re-select a new representative under supervision by Urban Poor Women Development (UPWD), World Vision Cambodia, Sahmakum Teang Tnaut (STT) and local authorities. At a June meeting in 2015, the Sangkat recognized that the Russey Sros community lives on private land that they themselves own. However, the community has not undergone the Systematic Land Registration process, without which no family can obtain a formal land title.

Despite the fact that they live on private land, residents may still face pressure to relocate. During an informal discussion with the Municipality of Phnom Penh (MPP), residents were made aware that the MPP plans to build a bridge from Koh Pich across the River, through their community. However, families have yet to receive any official notifications regarding these plans.

 

Problems/ Challenges

The community has lived under continuous fear of eviction, ever since they first heard of the MPP’s plan to build a bridge across the river which would force them to relocate. The community has access to electricity provided by the state and buys water from the Phnom Penh Water Supply Authority. There is no communal street lighting, nor are there any drainage systems. Some residents have a private toilet, while others use a “flight toilet” – wherein they relieve themselves in a plastic bag and then throw the bag away. There is no rubbish collection. Flooding has also been an issue throughout the three preceding rainy seasons, sometimes lasting more than four weeks.

The community comprises a number of challenges. These include water and air pollution, domestic violence, rampant drug and alcohol abuse; not to mention infrastructure challenges such as the lack of a proper drainage system, hygienic toilets, and the dilapidated state of homes in the area. Families living there are also concerned about the threat of eviction, and flooding problems.

Community members walked through flooding in the community during rainy season
Community members walked through flooding in the community during rainy season

 

Intervention by STT

Sahmakum Teang Tnaut (STT) has monitored the situation and collected information in the area since 2012. STT has also attempted to map the community, but this has yet to happen. The community empowerment project invited community representatives to attend community exchange visits both in Phnom Penh and in the province. These visits enabled them to witness real urban situations and provided great opportunities for communities to share knowledge. The communities notably demanded land tenure security through the implementation of systematic land registration. Additionally, community representatives and members were

invited to participate in the quarterly meetings that were conducted four times per year. It was a great opportunity for urban communities to meet each other, and to share challenges, experiences, and knowledge. This helped mobilize networks of communities to support each other through social activities with the aim of protecting their land and housing rights from the government and private companies. Exchange Learning visits helped increase capacity for community representatives to be able to exercise leadership within their community. Moreover, community members or representatives were able to gain from the project’s training. Training topics included the land law, secular 03, human rights, non-violence strategies, the basics of ICT, social media (Facebook, WhatsApp, Telegram, Signal, Citizen Journalism, Digital Security, Photo and Video making, and so on). The purpose of these trainings was to strengthen community capacity to protect their land and housing rights, and to be able to claim land title and security.

STT’s projects always teach how to produce community plans, monthly meetings, and ways to engage with local authorities for Sangkat Development action plans. Projects also teach advocacy and ICT skills, and how to monitor and reflect, once the activities are underway. Participants were also encouraged by the project to participate in a national forum on housing policy that was held by the Ministry of Land Management Urban Planning and Construction.

 

Result/ Outcome/ Change

After the projects, the Russey Sros community has become stronger and has developed good relationships with other urban land communities as well as local authorities. They now have the capacity to lead community and advocacy activities more independently, and with confidence. After the community’s struggles which lasted about 18 years, community residents are now waiting for the official land title from Khan Chbar Ampov, as the measuring process of each household is underway. The community members hope that they will get the land title in early 2022.

Since the community representatives and members have joined the trainings, quarterly meetings, workshops, forums, exchange learning visits, NGO advocacy, and Facebook live shows, they have learned about human rights, about land and housing rights, how to protect themselves from forced eviction, and what the main legal documents are, for demanding land and housing rights.

Community representatives and members have understood their rights and now have the capacity to conduct any activity both within the community and outside the community in order to discuss issues and to seek solutions from local authorities. Moreover, they have been submitting petitions to relevant government institutions which enables them to demand interventions on their land dispute. Furthermore, community members joined other communities and civil societies to participate in international events that promote human rights such as World Habitat Day, and International Human Rights Day. In addition, community members always conduct monthly meetings among themselves if they have urgent tasks to be discussed or need to mobilize support from NGOs like STT.

Community monthly meeting conducted by community representative, funded by STT
Community monthly meeting conducted by community representative, funded by STT

Throughout their monthly meetings, the community members have gained strength and empowerment by promoting discussion and sharing knowledge, experiences, and new approaches for claiming land titles for many years.

In October 2021, the authorities set up a committee for measuring the GPS of each household. They were informed that all households submitted their documents to relevant authorities to provide land titles where they are located.

Local authorities were measuring the plots of each community member to make a land title in 2021
Local authorities were measuring the plots of each community member to make a land title in 2021

The community leader of the community Mrs. Sek Saly, 53 years old, living with her husband and one daughter, told STT: “I am so happy to work for my community members and I want to help lift them out of poverty, I put my heart and soul into helping them to get Equity Cards and am waiting to see the result of land titles in the near future”.

Saly added: “Thanks to STT for supporting our community and training us to engage with local authorities in difficult times to achieve the recent changes in the community. STT helped me and other community members to know human rights, land rights, housing rights, communicating with community networks, NGO partners, and how to advocate for a proper solution. I suggest that STT provide more training to them to be able to share in the community.”

Cycling Event Around Boeung Tamok Lake to Join World Environment Day 2022

On May 19, 2022, a group of more than 30 young people who love the environment participated in a cycling event around Boeung Tamok lake, coordinated by the organizing team of the World Environment Day 2022 with 15 associations and organizations. The event has three main objectives:

First, to raise awareness of the general situation, benefits, and challenges of Boeung Tamok lake;
Second, to promote the youth rights in environmental protection and Third, disseminate information to stakeholders, especially those who have the right to decide, and to consider stopping the cutting and contribute to the degradation of Boeung Tamok lake.
The event started from a community located on the east side of Boeung Tamok lake, then continued along the Win-win boulevard, and then into the central part of the lake before continuing on to the west and the north.

In this event, there have also been some problems, such as the blockading of the road by the Prek Pnov district authority at the central part of the lake, which did not allow the youth to see the view of the lake and the deep pit that was dug to fill the lake. In addition, our youth group also had to cycle across the water because of flooding.

Despite some obstacles, our young people expressed their appreciation for the dedication and for their energy and time in this event.
Please note that Boeung Tamok, also known as Boeung Kobsrov is the largest natural lake in Phnom Penh, located in the northwest of the city along Win-Win Boulevard and has a total area of 3239. 7 hectares, covering two districts. 6 villages and 25 villages. Around the lake, there are about 300 families and about 1,000 people living there, most of whom are involved in fishing, raising fish, planting lotus, farming, and small businesses at home. The lake was determined by the sub-decree in 2016 and by the end of 2021, the lake area has been cut and handed over to private individuals and public institutions at least 46 times, covering a total area of 2,094 hectares or 65% of the lake area.

Call for grant applications Research/Studies on Human Rights and the Environment

1. Background 

Development is increasing at an unprecedented rate, in Phnom Penh, leading to long lasting environmental and social impacts. Wasteful and unsustainable housing for the rich, which are routinely undertaken prior to conducting comprehensive environmental and social impact assessments, are undermining the enjoyment of decent housing for the urban poor and contributing to the current climate crisis.

Cambodia comprises the largest youth and adolescent population in the South East Asian region. The involvement of young people in social and environmental development issues has been observed via social media and in groups throughout Phnom Penh. As a result, the youth are critical players in building and strengthening public outreach and awareness on urban and environmental issues in Phnom Penh, and manifest the great potential to drive economic and social development.

We are interested in original research proposals analyzing one of the topics below, from a human rights and environmental perspective, possibly also to do with the context of Covid-19:

– Poverty and Human Rights
– Rights of Persons with Disabilities
– Women’s Rights
– Environment and Human Rights
– Environment and sustainability
– Climate change
– Trash in Phnom Penh
– Flooding in Phnom Penh
– Good governance of communal development plans in the urban poor community
– Economic Inequality in Phnom Penh
– Other topics related to Environment and Human rights

2. Purpose

This project will aim to build the capacity of groups who are generally not given a voice, such as the urban poor and the youth, so that they are able to promote good environmental governance, in a safe and peaceful manner.

3. What Sahmakum Teang Tnaut Offers:

– Research grant: 800 USD to conduct individual research​ or group research.
– Technical support and monitoring during the research.
– Opportunity to be supported by STT to disseminate the paper via a soft-launch onto STT’s website.

4. Eligibility

Applicants are to meet the following criteria:

– Be nationals of Cambodia
– Applicants must have reached at least year two of a relevant university bachelor program, or be pursuing a graduate degree
– A candidate has the right to research only one topic

5. Deliverables expected from the researchers

The researchers are expected to join the various meetings and produce the following deliverables in Khmer or English. 

6. Timeline

No Activities Date
1 Interesting candidate registration for research 11-24, April 2022
2 Consultation Workshop on research 26 April 2022
3 Open submitting application 26 April to 03 May 2022
4 Shortlist candidates 06 May 2022
5 Oral interview 09 May 2022
6 Inform successor candidates 10 May 2022
7 First meeting​ with successor 14 May 2022
8 Providing technical support by STT experts 16-17 May 2022
9 Draft paper submission for review and input 10 June 2022
10 First paper submission 20 June 2022
11 Feedback commentary 27 June 2022
12 Second paper submission 30 June 2022
13 Second feedback commentary 7 July 2022
14 Final submission of the paper 15 July 2022
15 Reflection meeting with all grantees 19 July 2022

 

7.How to Apply 

Interested candidates can register through the link https://forms.gle/WRTNUbeCBp6mS1rb7 before 21 April 2022.

On a background of wooden blocks, a white pen, white paper clips and a white card with the text WE ARE HIRING. View from above

JOB ANNOUNCEMENT: MEAL Officer

Unit                 : MEAL (Monitoring, Evaluation, and Learning) Officer
Reporting to   : Program Manager

Main responsibilities, Tasks and Activities

The MEAL Officer is responsible for the following activities:

  1. Monitoring: To evaluate overall progress on STT’s achievement of results. In doing so, the MEAL officer will be expected to develop and strengthen monitoring, inspection, and evaluation procedures.
  2. Evaluation: To keep abreast of STT’s work at the internal and community levels. To provide inputs, statistics, and information to help STT develop quarterly, annual or other reports in due course. The MEAL officer is also expected to develop monitoring and impact indicators to evaluate a project’s success.
  3. Activity Evaluation: To suggest strategies to the Management Committee for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of a project by identifying possible obstacles in completing project activities and developing plans to minimize or eliminate such obstacles.
  4. Project Reviewing: To participate in project reviews, as well as planning workshops, to help each project manager prepare and set up relevant reports, and workplans.
  5. Quality Assessment: To carry out data quality assessments and audits regularly, based on MEAL indicators agreed with STT, to guide decision making, and to be of use in relevant reports.
  6. Capacity Building: To build capacity of staff through training, to ensure adoption of new data monitoring tools and quality of data collected.
  7. Safeguarding: To report all safeguarding incidents seen, heard, or suspected, using STT’s internal reporting mechanisms.
  8. Other Duties: May be required to work on other projects as agreed with the Management Committee or as directed by the Executive Director.

Performance Indicators

– The annual work plan will outline the outputs and outcomes for this post this will be monitored via supervision and annual appraisal.
– All posts at STT are subject to a 3-month probationary period.
– There will be a 6-monthly review to assess performance and listen to any issues the employee may have.
– This post is subject to the STTs terms and conditions of service. The post holder is expected to follow STT policies.

 

 

 

 

POVERTY ASSESSMENT This new report shows that urban poor communities are facing issues that need to be addressed urgently.

23 February 2022

This report is an assessment of poverty in urban poor communities in Phnom Penh. This report has found many concerning trends with regards to land and tenure security, and access to food and public services, all of which should be addressed as a matter of urgency by local authorities, and the government. 958 households were selected for interviews for this study, which constitutes an insight into the situation of 42 urban poor communities around Phnom Penh.

One of the findings listed in this report is the worrying lack of family documentation for urban communities.  47% of respondents claimed not to have their family book at home. This is especially concerning as family books are crucial for being able to vote, or to be registered for ID poor. The ID poor system has itself been strongly criticised by community members:

‘Nearly two thirds (64%) of respondents expressed the need for further assessment to be carried out for ID Poor. Respondents stated that they believe the system has missed poor families who are eligible for ID Poor.’ (Poverty Assessment, STT) 

The absence of a family book or registration onto the ID poor system can cause risks regarding tenure security. A family book is necessary to obtain ID poor status. This is especially urgent as the report has also found that some families have faced forced evictions over the last five years. The study has found that almost 50 respondents have endured forced evictions during that timeframe.

While this report highlights ongoing issues related to evictions, the report delves deeper into the social intricacies of housing and shelter, access to healthcare, food, and electricity, family vulnerabilities, and debt. Poverty has continued to affect many urban communities throughout Phnom Penh, and this has been exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. Saran Soeung, the executive director of STT explains:

‘Urban poverty is mostly disregarded. There are many problems ranging from income insecurity, land tenure security, health care, children’s education, and sanitation. These problems seem to have been overlooked by relevant stakeholders. Communities are increasingly at risk of an extensive range of vulnerabilities.’ (Saran Soeung, Executive Director, STT)

Concerning the threat of evictions, local authorities and the government need to facilitate dialogue between urban poor communities and potential evictees. This report has shown that victims of forced evictions are typically faced with threats, intimidation, and humiliation. There needs to be community consultations, transparency, and ongoing dialogue with relevant government institutions when a big development project has the potential to cause displacement and eviction.

You can download the reports as PDF files here! Khmer – English

For further information please contact: 

Mr. Soeung Saran, Executive Director of Sahmakum Teang Tnaut.

Tel: 089 666 013

Email: director@teangtnaut.org

Mrs. Prak Sotheary, Research Advocacy Advisor at Sahmakum Teang Tnaut.

Tel: 012 464 500

Email: advisor1@teangtnaut.org

Photographer for Photo Exhibition Terms of Reference (TOR)

1. Introduction and Background

Sahmakum Teang Tnaut Organization (STT) is located in Phnom Penh. STT was founded in 2005 and officially registered in 2006 as a local NGO supporting urban poor communities. “Teang Tnaut” means “Palm Leaves” and palm leaves are used by poor communities to build roofs, and walls for their houses. This simplistic name was chosen to remind STT that its work serves the poorest members of society. STT started as a small NGO that focused on technical upgrades in poor communities but over the past decade, many communities have been affected by development, land transfers, and evictions. As a result, STT has since grown to produce community maps, research and advocacy in order to achieve its goal of helping poor communities realize their rights to land.  Furthermore, STT also helps urban communities gain awareness of the ID Poor Program. STT’s efforts in Phnom Penh alone have reached 270,000 people. STT and its partners have helped communities express their concerns to national and international media, donors as well as national and international NGOs.

STT is looking to hire an external consultant to take urban poor communities and photos of lakes, for a photo exhibition which will be displayed in person and on social media to raise awareness and attract attention from the general public about communities’ living conditions and challenges.

 

2. Objective

To take 40 photos of urban poor communities and lakes which will be publicly exhibited, and shared on social media, to raise awareness, and to direct the public’s attention towards communities’ living conditions and challenges.

3. Methods and Tools

The consultant will take 40 photos, which relate to the urban poor communities and lakes in or near Phnom Penh that are targeted by STT.
– The consultant must have suitable photography equipment
– The consultant must guarantee that the photos will not be copyrighted
– The full work plan and timeline will be developed by the consultant and approved by the STT team.
– The consultant will receive comments from STT’s relevant staff in order to assure the collected photos are acceptable and in line with the project’s intentions.
– STT will cover the transportation cost for the consultant, traveling to communities and lake areas to collect the photos.
– The photos must adhere to children rights, and privacy norms

 

4. Expected Outcome and Deliverable

– Before commencement of work, the consultant is required to submit a final proposal which would include methodology, strategy, work plan, and budget to STT.
– 40 original and high-quality photos (which can be printed on A1 size) which relate to urban poor and lakes. The theme is “Urban Poor Communities and Inequality, in the face of City Development”. In addition, the photos can include the following aspects and themes:

+ Covid-19 pandemic and urban poor communities
+ Forced evictions
+ Infilling of the Lakes
+ Housing Rights and Challenges
+ Relocation sites

– After all the photos have been handed over to STT, they will become ownership of STT

 

5. Support Team from STT

The consultant will work closely with the community Housing Rights and Research (HRRP) Project Manager and Senior Human Resource and Admin Officer and relevant project managers and staff to facilitate this consultancy. Key contacts are as follows:

 

N0 Name Position Email
1 Mr. Seang Muoylay HRRP Manager muoylay@teangtnaut.org
2 Ms. Net Chanthida Senior Admin and HR thida@teangtnaut.org

 

6. Duration and Place of Work

This consultancy will commence as soon as possible and the duration of the contract will be 15 days from the start date. Specific duration will be stated in the service agreement once the consultancy is offered.

7. Consultancy Fee

The consultant will be compensated at a competitive rate.


8. Required qualifications of the Consultant

STT is looking for a consultant with the following qualifications:

– Experience in photography or in a relevant field
– Good communication skills
– Has their own materials for producing the needed photos
– Fulfils all obligations to gender sensitivity and demonstrates zero tolerance for sexual harassment
– Ability to adhere to deadlines and flexibility
– Khmer speaker is an advantage.

9.How to Apply

Interested candidates should send their application including:  CV highlighting relevant experience, a budget and sample work to STT’s Administration and Human Resources through email recruitment@teangtnaut.org. Note: Only shortlisted applicant (s) will be contacted for discussions and interviews.

Closing date: February 25, 2022 before 5pm.

Internship Opportunity with Sahmakum Teang Tnaut

About STT:

Phnom Penh based Sahmakum Teang Tnaut (STT) is a Cambodian Urban NGO that was set up in September 2005 and officially registered with the Ministry of Interior in December 2006. STT is seeking three interns, working full time in Phnom Penh city, to assist their Housing Rights and Research Project (HRRP).

Qualification

– At least a fourth-year student or a recent graduate in Lay, Social & Environmental science or a related field or community members
– Ability to use computer with application relevant to the study fields
– Good verbal and written communication skills in English and Khmer
– Willing to learn and commit to work full time and can travel to target communities (as required)
– Be honest, Loyalty, Friendly and hard working

Main responsibilities

– Attend training on how to use data gathering tools
– Go to the designated work sites to complete data enumeration
– Enter data into the designated system
– Assist project staff in community mapping
– Assist project staff in organizing community meetings or training
– Do other necessary tasks assigned by supervisors

What support will STT provide?

  1. Monthly allowance will be provided
  2. Training support – relevant to research techniques
  3. A desk and computer with internet access
  4. Work experience within an office and urban poor communities
  5. Interns can apply what they have learnt to specific projects
  6. The development of ideas through learning by doing

Duration: 3 months

Monthly allowance: USD 150.00/month

Deadline: February 14th, 2022

How to apply: Interested candidates should submit resume and cover letter to the address given below, Name: Sahmakum Teang Tnaut (STT)
Address : #07, St 494, Sangkat Phsar Deum Thkov, Khan Chamkarmorn, Phnom Penh
Phone : 023 555 19 64   Email: hradmin@teangtnaut.org  Website: www.teangtnaut.org

Stop Evictions: Boeung Chhouk A community should not be evicted during the Covid-19 Pandemic

Photo by Community

Khan Russey Keo authorities forcibly evicted 20 households of Boeung Chhouk A community, located on Street 598, in Group III, Boeung Chhouk Village, Sangkat Kilometer 6, Khan Russey Keo, Phnom Penh, claiming that the land was to be used for public development. As of 4 August 2021, 11 of the 20 houses were demolished without compensation. The local authorities promised each of the households 500,000 Riel (approximately USD $125) which they have yet to receive.

Khan Russey Keo authorities invited all 20 households for a meeting on 28 August 2020, to discuss the compensation in the form of plots of land to be provided to the affected community members. According to a community representative, Khan Russey Keo authorities promised to provide each affected household a 4m by 15m plot of land located along O Veng Cannal in Khan Russey Keo. At the time, all 20 households accepted the offer, but they have yet to see these promised plots.

A community representative said that “It is difficult now because we did not receive proper compensation. For now, some families are living with their relatives, or renting houses and one family has nowhere to go so they are living here in a tent.”

In relation to the process of relocating this poor community, the Phnom Penh Municipality and all authorities should respect, protect and fulfill the rights of the people to adequate housing and an adequate standard of living. The United Nations “Guidelines on Evictions and Resettlement” should be implemented effectively by ensuring that a solution is reached using a participatory approach that involves the community. In addition, the authorities should resolve these issues in peaceful way by providing adequate and equitable compensation to the remaining families and to continue to support the families who have been relocated by providing public services such as water, electricity, roads, as well as employment opportunities or social protection if they are not able to find work.

 

 

JOINT STATEMENT: “THE GOVERNMENT MUST HAVE STRONG MEASURES TO GUARANTEE WORKERS’ HEALTH AND SAFETY AT WORK IN THE COVID-19 CRISIS”

We, as representatives of trade unions, associations, communities and civil society organizations working in the labour and human rights sectors in Cambodia join in the global campaign for occupational health and safety as part of Workers’ Memorial Day. This day is commemorated annually on the 28th of April to push stakeholders to acknowledge the importance of promoting occupational health and safety for employees in all workplaces across the world, as well as in Cambodia.

Occupational health and safety is of paramount importance in the contribution of employers, unions, the Government, development partners and civil society organizations for joint action to overcome the COVID-19 pandemic in Cambodia. The COVID-19 pandemic poses challenges for us to maintain productive processes whilst workers’ health and safety are of primary attention in the workplace. Many employers have acknowledged that guaranteeing occupational health and safety has many important economic and production benefits in the workplace. Unions see the importance of COVID-19 safety in the workplace as something which the Government and employers must pay more attention to, but many employees today continue to face a lack of COVID-19 safety in the workplace. This causes high risks in overcoming this deadly pandemic to ensure the recovery of the well-being of people and employees in all sectors, economic recovery and social order and stability in Cambodia in the future.

The collapse of under-construction buildings in Preah Sihanouk Province in 2019 and Kep Province in 2020 were tragedies for employees in the Cambodian construction industry. After these two incidents, we have observed that the Royal Government, through the Ministry of Land Management, Urban Planning and Construction found many unauthorised construction sites not using proper construction techniques, affecting public order. Many workers became victims of workplace accidents and lost their lives yearly. In the garment and footwear sectors, workers face a transportation system which takes them from their homes to the workplace in trucks lacking proper safety specifications and carrying excessive numbers of workers. There is no safety supervision and many workers have lost their lives in road accidents while travelling.

It is time to reform the state policy system to promote occupational health and safety and these rules must be routinely applied to companies, enterprises and institutions. The provision of suitable facilities for informal economy workers is also a necessity, requiring the involvement of workers’ representatives, the competent authorities and civil society organizations in the necessary national and lower-level policy reform processes in order to ensure social order for informal economy workers in Cambodia.

Separately, we as representatives of union federations, associations, communities and civil society organizations working in the labour and human rights sectors in Cambodia observe that the current COVID-19 situation has severe effects to the livelihoods, health and safety of construction, service, hotel and informal economy sector workers stemming from the crisis and the strong lockdown rules of the Royal Government in red zones and locked down areas in Phnom Penh and Kandal. So far, approximately two thousand employees have been found to be COVID-19 positive in more than 90 factories in Phnom Penh and a number of other factories. The biggest concern for workers’ health and safety and risks are in other factories which have not yet found COVID-19 cases and workers will face a risk of returning to their workplace in a situation where there is no guarantee of occupational health and safety.

From seeing the risks and challenges to workers’ occupational health and safety detailed above, we, as representatives of trade union federations, associations, communities and civil society organizations working in the labor and human rights sectors would like to make the following requests to the Royal Government and relevant stakeholders:

  1. Create a mechanism with workers’ representatives, employers, civil society organizations to monitor and evaluate occupational health and safety, in particular during the COVID-19 pandemic at construction sites and construction companies.
  2. Push for regular, effective, and transparent labor inspections to be conducted to inspect occupational health and safety conditions and immediately all construction companies across Cambodia with the National Social Security Fund (NSSF).
  3. Provide reasonable, clean accommodation to employees and pay additional attention to the provision of personal protective equipment such as masks, hand sanitiser and temperature checks in the workplace at factories, enterprises, and establishments which have not yet implemented the Ministry of Health’s rules or the World Health Organisation’s guidelines to ensure that workers are safe at work.
  4. Review workers’ system of travel and ensure social distancing in transportation to factories during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  5. Issue clear measures in workplaces facing risks, in particular at factories, and allow workers to take paid leave at appropriate times.
  6. Put in place social assistance programs such as emergency aid including food and other daily necessities provided in a timely manner during periods of lockdown, in particular for workers in red zones.
  7. Arrange clean, safe and suitable areas for traders, street vendors, market vendors and public vendors.

Phnom Penh 28 April 2021

This joint statement is endorsed by;

  1. The Cambodian Human Rights and Development Association (ADHOC)
  2. Sahmakum Teang Tnaut (STT)
  3. Cambodia Youth Network (CYN)
  4. Cambodian Alliance of Trade Unions (CATU),
  5. Independent Trade Union Federation (INTUFE),
  6. Committee for Free and Fair Elections in Cambodia (COMFREL)
  7. Coalition of Cambodian Farmers Community Association (CCFC)
  8. The Cambodian Food and Service Workers Federation (CFSWF)
  9. Building and Wood Workers Trade Union Federation of Cambodia (BWTUC)
  10. Independent Democratic of Informal Economy Association (IDEA)
  11. Cambodia Tourism Workers Union Federation (CTWUF)
  12. Cambodian Center for Human Rights (CCHR)
  13. National Independent Federation of Textile Union of Cambodia (NIFTUC)
  14. Labor Rights Supported Union of Khmer Employee of Nagaworld (L.R.S.U)
  15. Center for Alliance of Labor and Human Rights (CENTRAL), Cambodia
  16. Solidarity House (SH)
  17. Cambodian League for the Promotion and Defense of Human Rights (LICADHO)
  18. Youth Resource Development Program (YRDP), Cambodia
  19. The Cambodian Human Rights Action Coalition (CHRAC)
  20. Cambodia Labor Confederation (CLC)
  21. Equitable Cambodia (EC)
  22. Free Independent Trade Union Federation (FUFI)
  23. Coalition of Cambodian Apparel Workers Democratic Unions (C.CAWDU)
  24. Cambodia Transportation Workers Federation (CTWF)
  25. Cambodian Industrial Workers Federation (CIWF)
  26. Cambodian Informal Economic Workers Association (CIEWA)
  27. Farmers Association for Peace and Development (FAPD)
  28. Cambodia Tourism Service Workers Federation (CTSWF)
  29. Cambodia Agriculture Workers Federation (CAWF)
  30. Coalition Free Trade Union of the Women Textile (CFTUWT)
  31. Cambodia Institute for Democracy (CID)
  32. Asian Tourism Employee Union of Raffles Le Royal Hotel (AEURLH)
  33. Workers’ Solidarity Strength Independent Union (WSSIU)
  34. Transparency International Cambodia (TI)
  35. Coalition for Integrity and Social Accountability (CISA)
  36. Cambodia Independent Civil Servant Association (CICA)

PDF format:  Download full statement in Khmer Download full statement in English

Consultant to Produce Advocacy Video Terms of Reference (TOR)

1. Introduction and Background

Sahmakum Teang Tnaut (STT) is located in Phnom Penh. STT was founded in 2005 and officially registered in 2006 as a local NGO supporting urban poor communities. “Teang Tnaut” means “Palm Leaves” and palm leaves are used by poor communities, to build rooves, and walls for their houses. This simplistic name was chosen to forever remind STT that its work serves the poorest members of society. STT started as a small NGO that focused on technical upgrades in poor communities but over the past decade, many communities have been affected by development, land transfers, and evictions. As a result, STT has since grown to produce community maps, research and advocacy in

order to achieve its goal of helping poor communities realize their rights to land and housing and awareness contain accurate information on ID Poor program. STT’s efforts in Phnom Penh alone have reached 270,000 people. STT and its partners have helped communities express their concerns to national and international media, donors as well as national and international NGOs.

STT is looking to hire an external consultant to produce advocacy videos which will be posted on social media to raise awareness on a variety of urban issues.

2. Objective

To produce three advocacy videos which will be posted on social media to raise awareness on a variety of urban issues.

3. Methods and Tools

– Consultant will produce three advocacy videos
– The concept of the videos will either be provided by STT or proposed by the consultant
– Stories, photos, videos, images, audio, infographics and other materials related to the process of producing the video will be developed by the consultant
– The consultant must guarantee that the videos produced will not be copyrighted
– The full work plan and timeline will be developed by the consultant and approved by the STT team before commencement of work
– Travel to communities to collect media material
– Perform appropriate short interviews with partners, community members and other stakeholders

4. Expected Outcome and Deliverable

The consultant will submit to STT

– A final script of each video before commencement of work. The duration of each video will not exceed 10 minutes.
– Narration, translation and subtitles in English.
– Original photos, videos, images, audio, infographics which will be used in the video.
– Three advocacy videos of high quality and resolution.

5. Support team from STT

The consultant will work closely with the community Housing Rights and Research (HRRP) Project Manager, Community Mapping, Housing Improvement and Urban Resilience (CMHRP) Project Manager, Program Manager, Senior Human Resource and Admin Officer and relevant project managers and staff to facilitate this consultancy. Key contacts are as follows:

N0 Name Position Email
1 Mr. Seang Muoylay HRRP Manager muoylay@teangtnaut.org
2 Mr. Em Khemara Program Manager khemara@teangtnaut.org
3 Ms. Net Chanthida Senior Admin and HR thida@teangtnaut.org
4 Mr. Lors Sren CMHRP Manager lorssren@teangtnaut.org

6. Duration and Place of Work

This consultancy will commence as soon as possible and the duration of the contract will be one month from the start date. Specific duration will be stated in the service agreement once the consultancy is offered.

7. Consultancy Fee

This consultancy fee is maximum $ 3,400.

8. Required qualifications of the Consultant

STT is looking for a consultant with the following qualifications:

– Experience in producing advocacy videos for NGOs, the private sector or the government;
– Exceptional photography and videography skills;
– Excellent photo and video editing skills;
– Ability to adhere to deadlines and flexibility;
– Highly effective team player;
– Good communication skills;
– Khmer speaker is an advantage.

9. How to Apply

Interested candidates should send their application including CV highlighting relevant experience, a budget, and sample work to STT’s Administration and Human Resources through email, thida@teangtnaut.org, and cc Mr. Em Khemara at khemara@teangtnaut.org. Before commencement of work, the consultant is required to submit a final script of video and work plan to STT.

Note: Only shortlisted applicant (s) will be contacted for discussions and interviews

Closing date: April 13, 2021 before 5pm.
You can download the PDF files here! English